Pascale Camy

‘My initiation into clay began 17 years ago in a private studio, after attending both drawing and painting classes at Montpellier School of Fine Arts outside of my working hours. I grew to love sculpture and it became an obvious career choice, a decision I made after learning a certain number of key techniques (modeling clay, casting, wax, plaster, direct carving…) My journey as a sculptress truly began when I enrolled at the Maison des Artistes (House of the artists) in June 2001.

I discovered numerous materials over the years, in particular bronze and marble, the latter taking me to Italy where I worked on a regular basis in the Corsanini workshop in Carrare. Bronze soon became part of my work, as I find that it gives presence to the pieces and enhances the polished curbs. I create “original” pieces, that is to say all sculptures are limited edition, numbered, limited to 8 numbers and 4 artist’s proof.

Rich in silica, a compound that fires at high temperatures, stoneware is a predominant material in my work on which I perform block modeling; the subtraction of matter from the mass. The highlight of working on both stoneware and bronze is the application of the patina, carried out once the piece is fired, using pigments, wax… the possibilities are endless.

I seek harmony within the shapes, I blend curves and distinct lines, on a perpetual quest to find the perfect harmonious line, the line that will give the piece structure and identity. Up to now I have favored polished work, but my work is ever evolving and I continue to outline the structure of the piece, to shape the surface with patterns, printing effects, flirting with the feeling of incompleteness. In each case, I like to get to the heart of the matter by eluding the details and drawing attention to the main lines.

My sources of inspiration are diverse and heavily rooted in Asian, notably Japanese, culture. associate this culture with a pure and uncluttered vision that corresponds to my personal quest: Get to the crux of the matter in few lines. The subjects are varied, essentially yet not exclusively dealing with humans. The idea of combat led me to sculpt sumo wrestlers, alone or in battle, as in a dance ritual. The discovery of illuminating rolls of Japanese poetry form centuries past inspired me to play with the pleats and folds of the kimonos in an organized tangle, simultaneously veiling and unveiling, expressing a certain idea of femininity.

Sculptures are for me as a search for oneself…‘